My PR experiences: 6 months at High-Rise

Last weekend was six months since I started at High-Rise. To mark the occasion, I wanted to share what I’ve learnt from a PR perspective.

Coming from my background in music PR, moving to a different industry has been both challenging and extremely rewarding. Following 15+ years in the music industry, the move into working mainly with charities and social enterprises was certainly a change in pace. But it has also allowed me to expand my knowledge. Working with a diverse array of clients who all have different PR support expectations has taught me a lot.

While music and corporate PR are very different in some ways, some aspects are also similar. This has allowed me to apply underlying principles I’ve learnt when planning campaigns, building relationships and executing ideas.

Here are some things I’ve learnt along the way during what has been an extremely enjoyable and rewarding six months working with a friendly, bright and motivated team.

PR Relationships matter

The majority of my work in music PR relied on building relationships with relevant journalists and industry peers. Starting out, this was difficult, made easier by attending events and meeting people in-person. After some time, I built these relationships to a point where I would work regularly with key journalists in the publications my artists wanted to be present in. This was made easier in my last job, where I was able to invite the key writers to festivals and incentivise them to cover the event. After all, what music writer doesn’t want to attend events and be well looked after?

Moving into my new role at High-Rise, I have had to alter my approach to building relationships. Working in these sectors required just as much relationship building, but this has meant a shift in how this is achieved. Attending conferences and networking events has given me the same opportunities to meet and connect with people. The approach is slightly different, but the underpinning principle remains the same.

Hooking a journalist

Working in music PR, it was vital to identify writers who had a specific interest in a particular genre. It was also important to identify journalists who had covered similar angles to the features you were pitching for.

Working at High-Rise, this approach still applies, just on a larger scale. Due to the nature of the clients we work with, a lot of them are looking for national coverage. With niche topics, it’s equally important to make sure you find the relevant reporters who have written about similar issues before. Forbes published a really insightful article on this, which can be found here: https://www.forbes.com/sites/adriandearnell/2019/07/23/what-do-journalists-want-three-ways-to-get-media-attention/?sh=5a48d799ec10

Reviewing media with ethics in mind

In a world that is fuelled by consumption, lavish lifestyles and partying, sustainability and ethics isn’t at the forefront of most artists’ minds. Moving into working with more organisations who place these values at the core of what they do means that more attention is placed on whether these media share those values. This has led to an extra layer when reviewing suitable targets for our clients. Not only do they have to be the right target audience and have a sizeable reach. They also have to reflect the values at the core of the businesses we work with.

This is just a snapshot of what has been a whirlwind six months. I’m looking forward to continue learning and working with an amazing team in High-Rise to achieve our goals in 2023!

For anybody interested, I spoke more about relationships at work in this piece.